Junctions

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This section contains a selection of basic junctions that can be used in a railway network in Mashinky. These junctions vary in complexity and utility. The intention of this is to provide fundamental ideas, which can be built upon to create more complex track configurations with higher train capacity.

All the examples below have the basic signaling shown on the images, better signalling positions can improve their performance.

Y-Junctions

Y-Junctions act as a convergence or divergence points between two routes on a railway line. Simple solutions work well, but tend to have significant drawbacks when used at high capacity.

Image Name Information Signalling Complexity No. of Points No. of Crossings
Junction Single.png Single Track Junction The most basic junction possible in the game Low 1 0
Junction Single Pass.png Single Track Junction with passing loop A more advanced junction with space to allow trains to pass. Medium 3 0
Junction Branchline Ladder.png Branchline with Ladder Junction A basic junction from double track to a two-way single track line. Only one train can use the Branchline Low 3 1
Junction Branchline Split.png Branchline with double track entrance An advanced junction from double track to a two-way single track line. Multiple trains can use the branchline. Low 3 1
Junction Mainline Split.png Mainline Split A basic junction for splitting a double track mainline into two directions. Flow is restricted to one train across the junction even if two trains accessing the junction do not cross each others paths. Low 2 1
Junction Mainline Continuous Flow.png Mainline Continuous Flow Junction An advanced mainline junction which poses no restriction on the flow of trains. Low 2 0

T-Junctions

These Junctions differ from Y-Junctions as they allow trains from any of the 3 directions to split into either of the 2 other outbound tracks.

Image Name Information Signalling Complexity No. of Points No. of Crossings
Junction 3-Way Free-Mainline.png 3-Way Junction with free Mainline A big mainline junction that can handle a lot of trains. PRO: No restriction on the flow of trains on the mainline. Trains can exit to every direction. CON: Tricky tunnel construction. Low 3 0
Junction small 4-to-2-3Way.png Small 4 Line to 2 Line Junction Big 3-Way Junction for use on 4 Mainlines. This junction that can handle lots of trains. PRO: No restriction on the flow of trains on the mainline. Trains can exit to every direction. CON: Tricky tunnel construction. Big junction. Medium 6 0
Junction big 4-to-2-3Way.png Big 4 Line to 2 Line Junction Big 3-Way Junction for use on 4 Mainlines. This junction that can handle lots of trains. PRO: Doubble Bridges on Mainline. Seems to be complicated. CON: Tricky tunnel construction. Big junction. It is complicated. Medium 8 0
Junction Big 4 line 3Way.png Big 4 Line 3-Way Junction Big 3-Way Junction for use with 4 Mainlines. This junction that can handle a huge amount of trains. PRO: Easy to build 4 Line Junction. Not too Big. CON: Tricky tunnel construction. Long tunnels lead to 6 field long signal block. Medium 8 0

X-Crossings

These are for locations on the tracks where two lines must cross over each other, with no tracked connection between the two.

Image Name Information Signalling Complexity No. of Points No. of Crossings
Junction Crossing Level.png Crossing on the Level A simple method for two mainlines to cross. Flow is restricted to one train across the junction even if two trains accessing the junction do not cross each others paths. Low 0 4
Junction Bridge Overpass.png Overpass Using bridges to cross other tracks, top line must be perpendicular to the grid, lower lines can be in any orientation. Minimum hight difference of 3 between the two lines. None 0 0
Junction Tunnel Underpass.png Underpass Using Tunnels to cross under other tracks, bottom line must be perpendicular to the grid, top lines may be in any orientation. Minimum hight difference of 3 between the two lines. None 0 0


X-Junctions

These are for locations on the tracks where lines cross over and trains can switch between both lines. These junctions are usually complex to build and take a lot of space.

Image Name Information Signalling Complexity No. of Points No. of Crossings
Junction Clover.png Clover Leaf Interchange A Line that allows a continuous flow of trains over it. Trains can exit the junction in all 4 directions. This junction takes up a lot of space, reducing its feasibility to large flat maps with long distances between train destinations. Med 16 0
Junction Jewel.png Jewel A continuous flow junction, which allows trains to exit in all 4 directions. This junction is more compact than the Clover Leaf, however it incorporates more gradients and curves which limits train speeds through the junction. Low 8 0
Junction Diamond.png Diamond Crossing This junction is useful for placing in stations at the end of the line. This junction can be combined with the Main Terminus to prevent train blockages when operating with more trains than the number of available platforms. High 4 1
Junction Small 4-Way.png Box Junction Again a continuous flow junction, which allows trains to exit in all directions. PRO: The track splits before being merged to avoid double use of individual sections. CON: The two long bridges, which each results in a 7-field wide Signal block. Medium 16 0
Junction 4-Way Snake.png Windmill Junction Enhanced Version of the Box Junction. PRO: Tracks Split before Merge and shorter bridges to cut the max Block size to a 5-field wide Signal block. CON: Every Train that turns left or crosses the juntion has to climb 2 slopes. Medium 16 0
Junction Big 4-line 4way.png Big Windmill Junction 4 Line Version of the Windmill Junction. PRO: Tracks Split before Merge. Easy to Bild. Can handle a hugh ammount of Trains. CON: A realy big Junction. Long tunnels lead to 6 field long signal block. Medium 12 0

Terminus Junctions

These are a selection of junctions that go at the end of a railway line, these are designed for both high capacity and the ability to turn the trains around to prevent the locomotives from reversing on their return journey. The maximum number of trains refers the number of trains can use the station without a risk of causing a blockage. All stations below can have their capacity increased by placing block signals.

Image Name Information Signalling Complexity Max No. of trains No. of Points No. of Crossings
Junction Return Loop.png Return Loop A simple method of turning around trains at the end of the line. Low 2 1 0
Junction Turning Triangle.png Turning Triangle An alternative method of turning around trains at the end of the line. Medium 2 3 0
Junction Roundabout.png Roundabout An advanced version of the return loop, this version allows multiple lines to feed into a single station. One-way signals must be used to allow for continuous flow. High n 3 x n 0
Junction Turminums.png Main Terminus A high capacity railway station that works with a continuous supply of trains. There are no reversing facilities, therefore best used when reversing trains are disabled. Further signalling and platforms can be added to increase the capacity of the Station beyond a 3-train limit. Medium 3 7 2
Junction Turminums With Triangle.png Main Terminus with Turning Triangle A variation of the Terminus station with reversing facilities. Further signalling and platforms can be added to increase the capacity of the Station beyond a 3-train limit. High 3 8 2